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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 827 (some duplicates have been removed)
not accept what happened from some of the citizens of the united states who offended the prophet mohammed-- peace be upon him. there was also somebody who wanted to burn the koran and this is something we do not accept at all. so the demonstrations were an expression of a high level of anger and a rejection of what is happening and the u.s. embassy represents the symbol of america as a people and government so people, the demonstrators, had a loud voice and as a government, it's our responsibility as the government of egypt we protected the embassy. we do not condone any attack against any embassies or any guests. this is a part of our principles and culture and what our religion orders us to do. >> rose: so the united states government and egyptian government are friends, not enemies? >> ( translated ): we are not enemies, of course. >> rose: you're our friends? >> ( translated ): for sure we are friends. >> rose: allies? >> the u.s. president said otherwise. >> rose: i know he did. but i'm asking the egyptian president. do you consider the united states an ally? >> ( translated ): this
the united states government and egyptian government are friends, not enemies? >> ( translated ): we are not enemies, of course. >> rose: you're our friends? >> ( translated ): for sure we are friends. >> rose: allies? >> the u.s. president said otherwise. >> rose: i know he did. but i'm asking the egyptian president. do you consider the united states an ally? >> ( translated ): this is depending on the definition of an ally. we have a real partnership in the interest and we want to achieve the interest of the world and to participate in many issues-- diplomatic, political, economical-- exchange of expertise in several areas. so the understanding of an ally as a part of a military alliance this is not existing right now. but if you mean by ally, partner and special diplomatic relationship and cooperation we are that ally. >> rose: president morsi for the hour. next. >> tonight a special edition of charlie rose. >> rose: mohamed morsi won an historic election this june to become the fifth president of egypt. he is the first civilian to hold this title. two years ago it would have been
. this comes as protests against the united states rage, including in egypt, where it is now four 4:00 a.m. you are looking live at cairo. parts of the city, anti-american rioters are swarming the streets, spewing hate against the united states. we have no idea what tomorrow brings, as the sun begins to rise in a short time. but this day has been extremely violent, with violent protests across the mideast and north africa, durn turning deadly. in egypt, police clashing with stone-throwing rioters outside the embassy. one person was killed. in sudan, the heaviest violence, protesters storming the u.s. embassy and setting the german embasso fire. in tunisia, police firing tear gas and gunshots towards protesters, attacking the u.s. embassy. two people were killed. dozens hurt. and an american school was burned down. in lebanon, a crowd of protesters setting fire to kfc and hardee's restaurants. one protester killed, dozens injured. and while chaos rein reigned overseas, another baths raged. >> in the days ahead and the years ahead, american foreign policy needs moral clarity and firmness of purpo
. but the u.s. has declined. the united states has never proposed iran a comprehensive package. never. my point is this. first, try at least once. i real hi don't care in iran whether we have a conservative or moderate president or reformist because i have been working for 16 years under the presidents and i know we did our utmost to get a good -- to bring the relation, to improve the relation with the u.s. and the u.s. always declined. therefore, this is the same policy during ahmadinajed. but they have better justification during ahmadinajed. they use the holocaust and all the these rhetorics which is very harmful for iran's national interests. my suggestion is this. any u.s. administration i hope after the election -- because we cannot talk before the election -- propose at least once after 33 years a comprehensive package including terrorism, weapons of mass destruction, peace process, israel, human rights, democracy, all these major points for the u.s. and iranians also they have their own shopping list. and the u.s. also should be prepared to address iranian concerns. if it failed,
about, this problem between israel and the united states over iran and what do we do about it? the prime minister is saying the united states ought to publicly draw a red line and tell iran you cannot go beyond this point in your nuclear weapons development. where do you see-- what do you see happening on this front? >> well, that's an approach i think that probably can't work, simply because the iranians may be doing things already that we don't know about. and i think it's legitimate to say, even if they don't cross the nuclear weapons threshold, if they get 90% of the way there, that's not a very comforting outcome. so let me suggest a different approach, bob. instead of red linees, let me suggest deadlines. what we ought to do is going to the iranians with a diplomatic offer and make clear what it is they have to stop doing-- all the enrichment material they have to get rid of, the international inspections they have to respect, and sanctions would be reduced and they would be out from under the risk of attack. if they don't meet the deadline, i think the united states, israel, and o
towards the united states and its citizens. >> schieffer: was this a long-planned attack, as far as you know. what do you know about that? >> the way this perpetrators acted, moved, and their choosing specific date for this so-called demonstration, i think we have no-- this leaves us with no doubt that this was preplanned, predetermined. >> schieffer: and you believe this was the work of al qaeda and you believe that it was led by foreigners. is that what you're telling us? >> it was plans definitely, was planned by forers, by people who entered the country a few months ago, and they were planning this criminal act since their arrival. >> schieffer: mr. president, is it safe for americans there now? >> the security situation is-- is difficult, not only for americans. even for libbians themselves. we don't know what are the real intentions. of these perpetrators. how they will react. but there is no specific particular concern, danger for americans or any other foreigners. but the situation is not easy to keep stability. yes >> mr. president, will it be safe for the f.b.i. investigators
of saudi intelligence, ambassador to the united states and other countries >> a throughou these 80 some years that we have had our kingdom, everybody keeps talking about an uncertain future for the kingdom and because of the sagacity of the people of saudi arabia and the good will of the leadership and the government we have survived pretty well so far we have many problems to face, including syria. many challenges internal among the ung pele and how the go about the courses of development not just economically but socially and politically and the role of women, etc. all of these are tremendous challenges that are being debated within the kingdom and not coming from the outside. >> rose: tom friedman and prince turki al-faisal when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tom friedman is here, he is a pulitzer prize winning columnist in for the "new york times." for more than 30 years he's been writing ant foreign affairs, american politics and so much more. in addition to serving as bureau chief in beirut
of the united states and i think he really did make it worse by sitting down with "the view." i love "the view," i love the show, they're all friends. i'm a big fan. but in was not the moment to sit down with "the view." that's done by mitt romney, by barack obama, by everyone else. but not this day and at this time. >> jamie rubin, there is a schedule. obviously that the campaign feels it wants to keep. they have a lot of events coming up just today. joe scarborough said this morning so meet with folks for 15 minutes. to something. what would you say about this? >> well, i come from the foreign policy side of the house and worked at the state department and the president's schedule would come up in meetings with the white house. and there's always this tension between the election calculations, the political calculations, and those in the foreign policy professionals. you know, from the standpoint of a professional, obviously you'd like to see the president engage with these crucial countries, not just our friend israel, but a lot of friends that we have in the world or as andrea put it, coun
of days ago, president obama said egypt was not exactly the united states' ally, but it wasn't its enemy either. did those words have anything to do with this? >> reporter: i think there is a certain amount of alarm among the leadership of the muslim brotherhood. those i've spoken with did seem to get the message, that the united states was unhappy with the response or the reaction of mohammed morsi, the egyptian president, to the breaching of the american embassy. they felt that maybe it's time to start sending out a more reassuring messages to the united states. but what's significant is that on the one hand the message is come i coming out in english to a nonarabic audience, seemed to be pointing in the direction of reconciliation. i was at a demonstration this morning at a mosque not in the tahrir square area where it was organized by the muslim brotherhood. and the chants were not reassuring. one of the chants was "obama there are a million osamas." referring, of course, to osama bin laden, be chanting that united states is the enemy of god. it appears that the muslim brotherhood is
it because he loved the work. he really thought the mission of the united states to help these fragile countries move ahead, start anew, that's what he really loved about libya. from the time that he was working to restore ties with the libyan government to being an envoy to the opposition and helping the rebels on the ground in bengzi, to now becoming the u.s. ambassador to libya, he really was someone that felt it was really important to kind of -- the democratic values and need to build proper institutions and try and have a peaceful stable country. >> we understand that he was really regarded in some ways as a hero to the rebels and the people in benghazi in particular. how did he feel? how comfortable did he feel moving around in libya? >> he felt very comfortable. that's what a lot of people are talking about today that maybe he felt a little too comfortable. chris was someone that felt very at ease in benghazi. he knew the area well. he knew the country well. so he might have not -- he might have felt a little bit more immune than some other people would to his safety because he
the united states, i am sure libya receives money. it was even greater because the american ambassador -- i am supportive of the arab spring. the times and elsewhere, i said to myself, they are not great people. but they are people that surely will turn out nice to us. it doesn't make any sense. >> the events of the last week, the embassy attacks, it will result in a further ongoing shift of jewish americans changing -- >> i think there is a little more to follow. the shift in special elections indicated deep distrust of this administration. that was clear. what the administration said, you heard what the state said. the message was sent loud and clear. for a while, i think it was always together. we have heard the state department say that they have taken every reasonable step. we have heard the quote from the ambassador suggesting he was comfortable and these people love me. it's not true. he issued a statement saying he is very concerned about his own safety. again, we have an information gap. that is coming home to roost. this will build. >> today's new york times, the interview with th
is it perceived as weakness? >> because the united states has essentially abandoned the rhetoric and approach about the war on terror out of a mistaken view somehow the war on terror is offensive to all muslims. that is simple minded view of the muslim world to begin with and fails to recognize how much harm terrorism has brought to muslims. it also shows a declining withdrawing america from iraq, from afghanistan, not being able to deal with terrorism in places like syria and the gaza strip and not being able to restrain iran and support for terrorism and nuclear weapons program. all of that continues of the impression of declining united states. >> jamie: and increasing sentiment of anti-americanism in places we wouldn't have expected it and those perceived as allies like pakistan in the news today. the question is, can this sentiment not only be from the protestors and from the treasureists of the world but also from the governments of these countries that we need to count as our allies in a war against terror? >> pakistan is very, very difficult country from the u.s. perspective and in th
. >> the united states condemns in the strongest terms this outrageous and shocking attack. since our founding, the united states has been a nation that respects all faiths. we reject all efforts to denigrate the religious beliefs of others. but there is absolutely no justification to this type of senseless violence. none. >> not content to sit on the sidelines at a critical moment in his presidential campaign, governor mitt romney plunged himself into the middle of this developing crisis, sharply criticizing the president by a written statement last night and doubling down on that criticism this morning. >> when our grounds are being attacked and being breached, that the first response of the united states must be outrage at the breach of the sovereignty of our nation. and apology for america's values is never the right course. the president and his administration have done something which is inconsistent with the principles of america. >> team romney has thus far focused its misleading attacks on a statement made by the u.s. embassy in cairo before any attacks began. it was a preemptive stat
to you. i wish to greet all of the wonderful people of the united states and all of the people who will see your program. at the end of the day, if you do have personal animosity towards me, don't transfer that on to the rest of the people of the united states. we love the people of the united states and they also wish in return peace and stability for all of the world. >> you've come here to make a speech to the united nations. many are saying it's the most important speech of your life. do you feel that? >> translator: no. this is not the most important speech of my life, but i do believe that every moment of a human being's life are the most important for that human being, because they will not come back. if you lose today, today's gone for good. one day of your life is gone. therefore, every moment counts, every moment is important. i have been coming to the united nations general assembly for eight years now, seeking progress and friendly relations with all nations, and the objective is still the same. >> the reason that people think it's so important is that they believe that
of the united states in our region encourages extremism. >> surprising. how would you feel if one of your children dated a jew? and heated. especially when i asked him about basic human rights for gays. >> do you really believe that someone is born homosexual? >> yes, i absolutely believe that. yes. >> i'm sorry. let me ask you this. do you believe that anyone has given birth through homosexuality? homosexuality ceases procreation. >>> good evening. welcome to a special edition of "piers morgan tonight." looking live at new york city, home of the united nations. world leaders from 193 countries are gathering for the annual meeting of the general assembly. president mahmoud ahmadinejad will address the meeting on wednesday. he had blistering words at israel today. more on that in a moment. he took aim at the security council on the subject of iran's nuclear program. >> translator: we have business that some members of the security council with little rights have chosen silence with regard to the nuclear warheads of the fake regime while at the same time they impede scientific progress of o
anniversary of the september 11 attacks, united states embassy in egypt under siege by radical islamists. those events and prospect of a downgrade of u.s. debt complicating suddenly the president's re-election efforts which only appeared to be brighting. we take all of that up here tonight. congressman randy forbes joins us, member of the armed services committee. former u.s. ambassador to the united nations john bolton. judith miller is among our guest. also ahead the chicago teachers on strike, demanding an ex-exorbitant raise. just because chicago has lousy schools doesn't mean that teachers should have to suffer along with their students? we take that up in the chalk-talk. >>> angry radical islamists in the streets of cairo, some scaling the walls of the american embassy chanting anti-american slogans and tearing down the u.s. flag and taking it down and replacing with black flag and with symbols that say there is no god but allah and mohammed is their messenger. there were warning shots from embassy marine guards, but no injuries reported. the embassy says the situation is fluid. an
know one thing about him. he does not fail. let's hear it for the next president of the united states. [applause] >> thanks, sweetie. that's quite an introduction here. i got how many introductions tonight? anyone else want to offer an introduction? thank you. this really is a critical time for the country, and i think a time of choice. elections are always about choice. i think the choice is in more stark relief than most electrics. i think in part because of where the country is. i think when you have $16 trillion in debt, when you see places like europe facing fiscal calamity or crisis, while you recognize these are critical times, what you have in this country, 23 million americans out of work, 23 million. when half the kids coming out of college can't find work or work consistent with an education that includes college, think about that? this is america. what's happened? and so the president and i offered two very distinct paths. his path is one which has been not just spoken about, we've seen it. we don't have to guess what his path might look like or what he would do, because h
and the united states. the united states has sard, i'm not going to let iran get the bomb. the president said, if they go assemble a nuclear weapon, that is a red line for me. president netanyahu says iran cannot have the no-how and technology. that's a red line for him. it's a difference of opinion. the prime minister is looking for the president to inch up on that line. i think the president made it clear he's not going to tolerate iran with a nuclear weapon. he dubt want to give iran wiggle room. doesn't want to show iran how far it has to go. >> you talk about setting a red line. you're talking about a potential strike or something militarily. that clearly raises a whole different set of discussions. the president also talked about the violent protests in arab countries over what he described at the crude and disgusting antimuslim video. what was the message he was trying to send to countries trying to move forward after the arab spring revolutions? >> he was trying to do a couple of things. on one hand, trying to say this violence is not the answer. clearly, the united states does not be
the long-term. despite the bumpy path and the disturbing images, it's in the united states fundamental interest that people have the ability to choose their own governments, that the governments be democratic and free. that's in our long-term best interest. we need to reinforce that. >> we are in the middle of a heated presidential campaign. there are different foreign policy visions. that's why we wanted to dedicate the hour today to understand these different views. mitt romney spoke out this week, criticizing the administration, talking about whether the united states was apologizing for some of the initial response to this. these were his comments this week. >> the administration was wrong to stand by a statement sympathizing with those who had breached our embassy in egypt instead of condemning their actions. i think it's a terrible course for america to stand in apology for our values. >> our embassies did not stand up for free speech in this initial response to this violence. and the republican charge is that it's weakness on the part of this administration that invites this kin
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 827 (some duplicates have been removed)

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